Eng, NI, Scot, Wales Waste Law

The management of municipal waste and land use planning – principal differences between Wales, England, Scotland and Northern Ireland. A similar summary table exists on the Defra website of the differences in Landfill Allowance schemes across the UK. If you wish to look at a specific policy area, click on the relevant heading.

England:

Waste policy determined by DEFRA.

Northern Ireland:

Waste policy devolved to the Northern Ireland Assembly.

Scotland:

Waste policy devolved to the Scottish Government (SG)

Wales:

Waste policy has been devolved to the Welsh Assembly.

England:

UK Government has primary legislation powers (for England and Wales).

Northern Ireland:

The Department of the Environment (NI) Planning and Environmental Policy Group (PEPG) is responsible for environmental legislation in Northern Ireland.

The Northern Ireland Environmental Agency (NIEA) currently takes the lead on advising on, and implementing, environmental policy and strategy. NIEA has the waste regulatory role as legislated for in the Waste and Contaminated Land (NI) Order 1997, and the Waste Regulations (Northern Ireland) 2011

Scotland:

Devolved to SG; some powers reserved by Westminster.

The Scottish Environmental Protection Agency (SEPA) has a statutory duty to protect the environment and human health from the effects of waste management and disposal. SEPA has both regulatory and enforcement functions.

Wales:

The Government of Wales Act 2006 enables the Welsh Assembly to bring forward its own programme of legislation, subject to scrutiny and approval by the National Assembly for Wales.

Following a referendum in 2011, the Assembly can now make laws for Wales on subjects for which the Assembly and the Welsh Assembly Government are already responsible, without needing permission from the UK Parliament first.

England:

DEFRA have responsibility for producing a waste strategy for England. The current waste strategy for England is Waste Strategy 2007, which was launched in March 2007.

Northern Ireland:

Toward Resource Management: The Northern Ireland Waste Management Strategy 2006-2020 provides a long term vision and framework for waste management in the Province: currently under review.

Key Waste strategy targets

National targets for household waste set out in Toward Resource Management were to recycle and compost:

  • 40% of household waste arisings by 2015
  • 45% of household waste arisings by 2020

Whilst no specific targets were identified for municipal waste, the NI Best Practicable Environmental Option (BPEO) Guidance 2005 suggested:

  • By 2010: recycling/composting rate of at least 35%, combination of Mechanical Biological Treatment (MBT) for about 10% waste
  • By 2013: recycling/composting rate of at least 40%, combination of MBT, Anaerobic Digestion (AD) and thermal treatments for about 20% waste, less than 40% to landfill
  • By 2020: recycling/composting rate of at least 45%, combination of MBT,AD and thermal treatments for about 30% waste, no more than 25% waste to landfill

In April 2011, the Waste Regulations (Northern Ireland) 2011 set new targets of:

  • 50% by weight of waste from households to be prepared for reuse or recycled by 2020 
  • 70% by weight of Construction and Demolition (C&D) wastes to be subject to materials recovery to 2010. 

The Department of the Environment NI recently held an open consultation on the possible introduction of a 60% municipal recycling/preparing for reuse/composting rate of 60%. The LARAC response is available in the Policy Archive.

The Northern Ireland Waste Strategy is currently under review.  

Waste Prevention: 

A Framework for Waste Prevention in Northern Ireland was published in 2005.

The Northern Ireland Assembly has committed to putting a place a Waste Prevention Programme in line with the requirements of Article 29 of the rWFD (by 12 December 2013)

Key regulatory drivers

The Waste Regulations (Northern Ireland) 2011 have fully transposed the requirements of the revised Waste Framework Directive (2008/98/EC) in the Province.

The Department of the Environment NI has recently held open consultations on the possibility on introducing a requirement for Site Waste Management Plans, Restrictions on Wastes to Landfill, a Recycling Policy (setting a 60%  Municipal Recycling rate target),  an Addendum to the Northern Ireland Waste Management Strategy, and a proposed Duty of Care Code of Practice for Northern Ireland.

The outcome of these consultations is expected to shape future waste regulation in Northern Ireland.

The LARAC responses to the consultations are available in the Policy Archive

Scotland:

In June 2010, the SG launched the Zero Waste Plan for Scotland. The plan sets the strategic direction for Scottish waste policy over the next 10 years.  

The regulatory changes required to implement the plan will be via the Zero Waste Scotland Regulations 2011* (due to be enacted in March/April 2012)

Key Zero Waste plan targets in 'Targets for Waste Recycling and Waste Composting' section

WASTE PREVENTION

The SG already has a 20 point action plan reduce household waste: the Household Waste Prevention Action Plan 2007

SG has also committed to putting a place a Waste Prevention Programme in line with the requirements of Article 29 of the rWFD (by 12 December 2013). An open consultation on this Waste Prevention Programme is due in Spring 2012.

KEY REGULATORY DRIVERS

The regulatory changes required to implement the plan will be enacted in the Zero Waste Regulations 2011. These Regulations introduce a series of regulatory measures including:

  • Source segregation and separate collection of key recyclable materials: paper, card, glass, metals, plastic (co-mingling will only be accepted where the waste hierarchy is not undermined and the outputs from the MRF are of a comparable quality to those collected separately at the kerbside); 
  • Source segregation of food wastes: in respect of separate food waste collections the Regulations will cover urban areas with a population over 125,000, other urban areas (10,000-125,000 population), and accessible small towns (3,000-10,000) and properties within 30 minutes drive of a settlement of 10,000 or more. The statutory requirement to collect food waste will be limited to households that can present a bin to the kerbside. It is hoped that current trials will enable clear best practice guidance to be made available promptly on, for example, food waste collection  services to high density housing (high rises etc);
  • A ban on  mixing separately collected recyclable materials;
  • A ban on landfilling the key recyclable materials;
  • A restriction on the inputs to thermal treatment facilities;
  • A ban on waste disposed of to landfill based on organic content

Where separate food waste collection is not being offered, there will be a requirement on LAs to promote food waste prevention and/or home composting

The timetable for introducing the measures is:

31/12/2013: Source segregation

  • All business must present dry recyclables, and medium/large businesses in food waste production, food retail and food preparation must present food waste for collection
  • Local Authorities must offer dry recyclables collection service and begin to roll-out food waste collections.

31/12/2013: Bans

  • Ban on mixing segregated materials
  • Ban on landfilling source segregated materials

31/12/2015: Source Segregation

  • Small food production, food retail and food preparation businesses must present food waste for collection
  • Local Authorities must complete roll-out of food waste collections

31/12/15: Bans

  • Existing facilities must remove dense plastic and metals from residual waste prior to incineration. All new facilities will be required to comply with this requirement on commencement of the regulations
  • Ban on the non-domestic use of food waste disposal units (macerators) and food waste digesters where the “treated” food waste is discharged into public sewers directly.

31/12/2020: Bans

  • Ban on biodegradable material to landfill
Wales:

Overarching, long-term framework for resource efficiency sustainable waste management.

Implementation via:
1.  6 key Sector Plans, including municipal C&I, Food and Retail Sectors

2.   Staturory Recycling and Recovery Targets

3.   Supporting Waste Prevention Programme (currently out for consultation)

England:

Mixture of Counties, Districts and Unitary Authorities. The authorities are represented in England by the Local Government Association.

Northern Ireland:

Northern Ireland is divided into 26 single tier local government districts which are supported by the Northern Ireland Local Government Association (NILGA).

A planned Review of Public Administrations, reducing the number of councils to 11, has been postponed until at least 2014.
 
In Northern Ireland some functions, which in other parts of the UK would be undertaken by councils, are provided by government departments or agencies, for example education, social services, planning, road and water services.  RPA may see Local Authorities (LA) taking on some of these functions. 

Scotland:

There are 32 single tier local authorities which are supported by the Convention of Scottish Local Authorities (CoSLA).

Wales:

Wales has a single tier of 22 local authorities, which are supported by the Welsh Local Government Associations (WLGA).

England:

Statutory Guidance PPS 10 will be revised taking into account the future revocation of Regional Spatial Strategies (RSSs).  There will also be new requirements (under the rWFD) to take the waste hierarchy into account in waste planning.  

Northern Ireland:

The 26 local authorities in Northern Ireland have formed into three sub-regional waste management groups for the delivery and development of waste management plans and infrastructure, for benchmarking and sharing best practice:

  • ARC21 
  • North West Region Waste management Group (NWRWMG) 
  • Southern Waste Management Partnership (SWaMP2008)

The three waste management groups in Northern Ireland have each prepared a waste management plan for their respective region for the period 2006 – 2020 in order to meet the NI Waste Management Strategy objectives (due for review when the updated National Waste Management Strategy is published).

Scotland:

The National Waste Management Plan (Scotland) Regulations 2007 transferred the duty to prepare a National Waste Management Plan from SEPA to the SG.

Scotland currently has 11 Waste Strategy Areas, each producing an Area Waste Plan (plans under review as part of the move toward Zero Waste Scotland).

Wales:

There are 3 regional waste planning areas in Wales which include the North Region, the South East Wales Region and the South Wales Region.

Review of the Regional Waste Plans in 2009 helped shape Toward Zero Waste, the Welsh Waste Strategy 2010

To reduce the administrative burden placed on local authorities through Assembly Government planning requirements, the Welsh Plan Rationalisation Programmed places no requirement on local authorities to produce individual waste management plans.

England:

DEFRA Guidance. Power in WET Act to require some authorities to produce MWMSs. Guidance published on MWMSs in July 2005.

Northern Ireland:

The three waste management groups in Northern Ireland have each prepared a waste management plan for their respective region for the period 2006 – 2020 in order to meet the NI Waste Management Strategy objectives (due for review when the updated National Waste Management Strategy is published).

Scotland:

Local Authorities produce individual Waste Strategy Implementation Plans in order to meet Area Waste Plans and Zero Waste Scotland objectives.

Wales:

Under the Welsh Plan Rationalisation Programme to reduce the administrative burden placed on local authorities through Assembly Government planning requirements, there is no requirement for local authorities to produce individual waste management plans.

England:

Landfill Allowance Trading Scheme (England) Regulations brought into force on 1st April 2005. There is trading of allowances. Biodegradable Municipal Waste (BMW) in England is 68%. Penalties for exceeding allowances are £150 per tonne of biodegradable municipal waste in excess of allowances held.

Northern Ireland:

The Landfill Allowances Scheme Regulations (2004) Northern Ireland (NILAS) came into force on 1 April 2005. The scheme does permit free transfer of allowances within NI, but does not permit trading of allowances.

Under the Landfill Allowances Scheme (Amendment) Regulations (Northern Ireland) 2009, the biodegradable content of collected municipal waste is assumed to be 64% by weight.

Penalties for exceeding allowances are set at £150/tonne of BMW.

The NILAS scheme is currently under review.

Scotland:

The Landfill Allowance Scheme (Scotland) Regulations 2005 came into force in April 2005.

The biodegradable content of collected municipal waste is assumed to be 64% by weight.

The Landfill Allowances Trading Scheme is currently suspended in Scotland.

Wales:

The Landfill allowances Scheme (Wales) Regulations 2004 came into force on 1 October 2004. 

The biodegradable content of collected municipal waste is assumed to be 61% by weight.

Penalties for exceeding allowances are set at £200/tonne of BMW.

The scheme has never permitted the transfer or trading of allowances.

England:

The Act requires local authorities in England to collect separately at least two separate recyclable fractions of household waste by 2010. Guidance document published in April 2005.

Northern Ireland:

This Act does not apply in Northern Ireland.

In transposing Directive 2008/98/EC (the revised Waste Framework Directive), Articles 18-20 of the Waste Regulations (Northern Ireland) 2011 require that from 1 January 2015 anyone collecting waste paper, metal, plastic, or glass must take all measures to ensure separate collection of these materials. Article 21 states that co-mingled collection is a form of separate collection for the purposes of regulations 18-20.

Scotland:

This Act does not apply in Scotland. 

In transposing the Directive 2008/98//EC, the Waste Framework Directive, the Zero Waste Scotland Regulations 2011 will require from the 31 December 2013 Local Authorities must offer source segregated dry recyclables collections to households and begin to roll-out food waste collections. The roll-out of separate food waste collections must be complete by 31December 2015.

The Regulations to source-segregate materials will cover urban areas with a population over 125,000, other urban areas (10,000-125,000 population), and accessible small towns (3,000-10,000) and properties within 30 minutes drive of a settlement of 10,000 or more. 

The statutory requirement to collect food waste will be limited to households that can present a bin to kerbside. It is hoped that current trials will enable clear best practice guidance to made available on, for example, food waste collection services to high density housing (high rises etc). 

Co-mingled garden/food collections will be permitted where they can be demonstrated to deliver equivalent or better environmental outcomes as a separate food waste collection. SG have stated that whilst LAs can make their own decisions regarding their preferred approach to food waste collection systems, further guidance may be issued to ensure common principals are applied by all authorities in making those choices.

Where separate food waste collection is not being offered, there will be a requirement on LAs to promote food waste prevention and/or home composting

Wales:
England:

National targets for household waste set in Waste Strategy 2007:

  • to recycle or compost at least 40% and recover value from 53% of household waste by 2010;
  • to recycle or compost at least 45% and recover value from 67% of household waste by 2015;
  • to recycle or compost at least 50% and recover value from 75% of household waste by 2020;
  • to reduce household waste not re-used, recycled or composted to 320kg/person/year by 2010 and to 225kg/person/year by 2020 (or equivalent weights/household).

Targets are currently under review.

Northern Ireland:

Currently as per Waste Framework Directive requirements, but new Recycling Bill set to be introduced by 2014 with a mandatory 60% LACMW target by 2020. The draft Bill is out for consultation at present; it seems likely that it will follow the Welsh model – with staggered targets and possible penalties for failure to achieve targets

Scotland:

Recycling, preparation for reuse or composting of LA household waste:

50% by 2013
60% by 2020
70% by 2025

Wales:

Recycling, preparation for reuse or composting of LA municipal waste:

52% by 2012-13 (achieved)
58% by 2015/15
64% by 2019/20
70% by 2024/25

90% reuse/recycling of C&D wastes by 2025

Maximum 30% residual waste by 2025.

England:

Targets for municipal waste set in Waste Strategy 2007:

  • to recover value from 53% of municipal waste by 2010;
  • to recover value from 67% of municipal waste by 2015;
  • to recover value from 75% of municipal waste by 2020.
Northern Ireland:

No specific targets in place.

NI Best Practicable Environmental Option Guidance (2005):

  • By 2010: recycling/composting rate of at least 35%, combination of Mechanical Biological Treatment (MBT)for about 10% waste
  • By 2013: recycling/composting rate of at least 40%, combination of MBT, Anaerobic Digestion (AD) and thermal treatments for about 20% waste, less than 40% to landfill
  • By 2020: recycling/composting rate of at least 45%, combination of MBT,AD and thermal treatments for about 30% waste, no more than 25% waste to landfill
Scotland:

Current 25% cap on local authority collected municipal waste sent to Energy from Waste (EfW) plants.

25% cap under review to incorporate emphasis toward dealing with all wastes and not just those managed by local authorities.

Wales:

No more than 30% waste to landfill by 2025.

England:

No targets.

Northern Ireland:

The Hazardous Waste Regulations (Northern Ireland) 2005 implement the Hazardous Waste Directive (Directive 91/689/EC) in Northern Ireland, and require separation and segregated storage of hazardous wastes.

Articles 45(2)-63 of the Waste Regulations (Northern Ireland) 2011 amend the above regulations in order to fully transpose requirements of the Waste Framework Directive (2008/98/EC).

All local authority Household Waste Recycling Centres act as Designated Collection Facilities for Waste Electronic and Electrical Equipment, and household batteries. Some individual authorities offer segregated collection facilities at their Centres for other hazardous household wastes, such as paints/thinners and automotive batteries.

Scotland:

The Special Waste Amendment (Scotland) Regulations 2004 came into force in August 2004, and require segregated storage of hazardous wastes.

Wales:

The Hazardous Waste (Wales) Regulations 2005 implement the Hazardous Waste Directive (Directive 91/689/EC) in Wales, and require segregation and separate storage of hazardous wastes.

The Waste (Miscellaneous Provisions) (Wales) Regulations 2011 are supplementary to the Waste (England and Wales) Regulations 2011, and make amendments to several Welsh statutory instruments for the purposes of transposing, in relation to Wales, Directive 2008/98/EC – for example, with regards to application of the waste hierarchy.

The Environmental Permitting (England and Wales) Regulations 2010 have further updated regulation relating to hazardous in order to meet Directive 2008/98/EC requirements (e.g ban on mixing hazardous wastes)

England:
Northern Ireland:

A Framework for Waste Prevention in Northern Ireland was published in 2005. 

It is expected that a Waste Prevention Programme will be announced in 2011/12 in accordance with Directive (2008/98/EC).

Scotland:

The Scottish Government has committed to develop a Waste Prevention Programme for Scotland in accordance with the Revised Waste Framework Directive (2008/98/EC) by the end of 2010. The programme will include Reuse activities.

Wales:

Towards Zero Waste sets waste reduction targets of:

  • 1.5% per year until 2050 (based on 2007 baseline)
  • 27% reduction in wastes by 2025 (based on 2007 baseline)
England:

No targets.

Northern Ireland:

No statutory targets in place.

Central Government Departments committed to reducing paper waste by 10% per year.

Many LAs in Northern Ireland have implemented Environmental Management Systems such as ISO 140001.

Scotland:

No specific targets.  However, non-municipal waste framework and waste prevention plans in place. Waste audits have been undertaken by LAs and action plans produced.

Wales:

The Public Sector Plan set out in Toward Zero Waste will establish the action plan objectives and targets for public bodies to reduce their waste arisings. Consultation due in 2012.

England:

(WPEG is no longer relevant)

Since 2008/09 funding to LAs has been through the Waste Infrastructure Capital Grant an un-ringfenced capital grant paid to upper tier authorities.  The grant which is payable until March 2010/11 is paid in recognition of the need to get front-end waste infrastructure, eg recycling and composting facilities on the ground in time to help England meet landfill targets. 

Northern Ireland:

NI Assembly Rethink Waste fund established for the introduction of capital and revenue projects/initiatives that will boost recycling and reuse activities. 

Scotland:

SG Zero Waste Scotland Fund provides funding to local authorities and Zero Waste Partner organisations in order to meet recycling and landfill diversion targets.

Zero Waste Scotland Food Waste Programme: £4 million funding (2011-12) to support separate collection of food waste.

Wales:

Wales Assembly Government support:

Revenue Support Grant, Sustainable Waste Management Grant, Regional Capital access Grant, Procurement Support, support for Food Waste Treatment Hubs and via the Residual Waste Treatment Consortia.

England:

Best Value.

Northern Ireland:

The local Government (Best Value) Act Northern Ireland 2002 requires local authorities to continuously improve with regard to economy, efficiency and effectiveness.

Individual local authorities have also adopted other quality management tools such as Charter Mark, ISO 9001 and the EFQM Excellence Model.

Scotland:

Best Value - under the Local Government in Scotland Act 2003: Best Value Guidance.

Wales:

Best Value in Wales comes under the Wales Programme of Improvement

England:

From April 2011/12 the National Indicator set will no longer be used to measure performance.  They will be replaced with a single list of government data requirements which are proposed to be reviewed on an annual basis.  The list is expected to be in place by April 2011.  Where information does not have to be reported nationally, Councils will be free to decide which of the existing indicators they wish to maintain for management and transparency purposes.

Northern Ireland:

Local authorities are required to report to the Department of the Environment NI regarding the Accounts Commission Performance Indicators, six key waste collection and disposal indicators.

Local authorities must also report quarterly to Northern Ireland Environment Agency (NIEA) on the following:

  • KPI (a) Household waste sent for recycling/composting as a % of household waste arisings
  • KPI (b) Household waste landfilled as  % of household waste arisings
  • KPI (e) Municipal waste sent for recycling/composting as a % of total municipal waste
  • KPI (f) Municipal waste landfilled as a % of total municipal waste arisings
  • KPI (g) Biodegradable Municipal Waste landfilled (tonnes)
  • KPI (h) Household waste per household per annum (tonnes)
  • KPI (j) Total municipal waste arisings (tonnes)
  • KPI (n) Municipal waste arisings increase/decrease as a % of preceding years arisings
  • KPI (p) Household waste per annum per capita (tonnes)
Scotland:

Required Accounts Commission Performance Indicators for waste management: waste disposal, collection, recycled, composted etc.

The Zero Waste Plan Scotland data and reporting requirements are:

  • Waste from households: by waste management method & Local Authority
Wales:
England:

The WasteDataFlow system is used to collect all statutory returns including lATS returns including those required for the Landfill Allowance Trading Scheme.

Northern Ireland:

Quarterly Waste Data Flow returns to NIEA.

Scotland:

Quarterly Waste Data Flow returns to SEPA.

Wales:

Quarterly Waste Data Flow returns to the Environment Agency Wales.

England:

The Association of Public Service Excellence (APSE) and other benchmarking clubs exist.

Northern Ireland:

No formal benchmarking club exists at present but some ‘ad hoc’ benchmarking of local authority activities is undertaken within the three sub-regional waste management groups, and also via the Northern Ireland Technical Advisory Group.

APSE Northern Ireland represents 13 local authorities, and the Northern Ireland Local Government Association (NILGA) is an associate member.

Scotland:

There are various working groups looking at benchmarking for different services/activities.

Association of Public Service Excellence Scotland (APSE) represents every Scottish Local Authority.

Wales:

Most local authorities are part of a Municipal Waste Benchmarking Club run by the Wales Audit Office.

All 22 councils in Wales are APSE members.

Co-ordinated by WLGA, the Waste Improvement Programme is developing a process of benchmarking waste finance data.

England:

Paid between WDAs and WCAs. Flexibility arrangements implemented in the Clean Neighbourhoods and Environment Act 2005. Presumption in favour of paying discretionary credits to charities under certain circumstances.

Northern Ireland:

Not applicable in Northern Ireland.

Scotland:

Not paid in Scotland as all authorities are unitary.

Services delivered by community sector groups in certain areas may be recompensed via service level agreements with local authorities.

Wales:

Not paid in Wales as the WDA and WCA are combined in each Unitary Authority. Third party recycling payments are paid (e.g. to community sector groups).

England:

WRAP running RecycleNow! waste awareness campaign in England.

Northern Ireland:

Rethink Waste NI is a national campaign funded by the Department of the Environment NI, and aimed at raising awareness of sustainable waste management in homes, schools, businesses and workplaces across NI.

Each of the 3 sub-regional waste management groups has a Communication Strategy and carries out joint waste awareness initiatives.

Environmental Youth Speak is an annual waste themed public speaking competition run across all 26 councils (now in it 13th year).

A majority of local authorities are Eco-Schools NI partners.

Scotland:

Zero Waste Scotland provides a wide range of training and guidance for key stakeholders as a means of driving the Zero Waste Plan forward.

Waste Aware Scotland provides a range of information, advice and resources for local authorities, community groups and the general public aimed at sustainable waste management.

Waste Aware Scotland also hosts a family of websites providing waste information for schools, businesses, students, as well as individual issues such as Waste Aware Love Food.

Wales:

Waste Awareness Wales is national consumer campaign designed to promote sustainable waste management practices,  e.g  free e-card service to  reduce paper waste, Clothes Swap ideas, Home Composting promotion.

Wales committed to the RecycleNow brand.

England:

The Business Resource Efficiency in Waste Fund was established to return to business £284 million of money raised over the period 2005 - 2008 through the landfill tax escalator. Some of this was available via NISP and Oxfordshire CC scheme to local authorities increasing recycling services to SMEs.  From 2010/11 these work streams have been incorporated into WRAP as the single delivery body.

A successor to the BREW fund has yet to be announced.  Further landfill tax revenues are added to the EPCS Block (Government) grant to local authorities.

Northern Ireland:

Landfill tax credits are no longer allocated to waste reduction and recycling activities in Northern Ireland.

The Northern Ireland Assembly Rethink Waste Fund also supports partnership working between local councils and community/third sector organisations on schemes which will boost waste recycling and reuse (both capital and revenue funding potentially available).

Scotland:

LTCS no longer used to directly fund waste management projects. 

Zero Waste Scotland has a range of funding opportunities for businesses, communities etc, for example the Zero Waste Community Engagement Fund:http://www.zerowastescotland.org.uk

Wales:

Landfill Tax Credit Scheme  funds spent on strategic projects to implement the Wales waste strategy

England:

WRAP running ROTATE. Other support from WIP. Regional Funding is paid by Local Authority Support Unit (LASU) to promote regional projects helping local authorities increase recycling and reduce waste.

Northern Ireland:

Support for local authorities in Northern Ireland is available from WRAP.

Scotland and Northern Ireland Forum for Environmental Research (SNIFFER) addresses knowledge gaps relating to environmental issues.

Scotland:

Zero Waste Scotland offers support to local authorities in Scotland.  SWAG (Scottish Waste Awareness Group) and CRNS will be incorporated into Zero Waste Scotland from 1st April 2011.  2010 is a transitional year. 

Scotland and Northern Ireland Forum for Environmental Research (SNIFFER) addresses knowledge gaps relating to environmental issues.

Wales:

Wales Government (WG) fund the Welsh Local Government Association Peer Review initiative to review the performance of each local authority and identify and disseminate good practice.

Waste and Resource Action Programme support (WRAP)

England:

WRAP operate the Love Food Hate Waste Initiative aimed at reducing food waste.

WRAP’s market development programmes, including food waste, C&D Waste, and business resource efficiency.

Northern Ireland:

WRAP Northern Ireland support programme for construction & manufacturing sector, composting, and businesses.

Scotland:

Zero Waste Fund has replaced the Strategic Waste Fund and is providing funding to local authorities to meet recycling and landfill diversion targets.

The Scottish Waste Awareness Group (SWAG) is coordinating a national recycling campaign.  

Zero Waste Scotland offers a range of support business support programmes and training to:  SMEs, the food and drink sector, construction sector, compost producers and operators of Anaerobic Digestion facilities, and to assist with meeting start-up costs for commercial food waste and services or additional infrastructure at existing treatment facilities.

Wales:

WRAP Wales support programme for construction & manufacturing sector, composting, and businesses.

England:

The community waste & recycling sector is represented by the Community Recycling Network, CRN UK which operates through REalliance as CRN UK, London CRN, CCN and FRN.  the weblink is:  http://www.realliance.org.uk

Northern Ireland:

Northern Ireland Environment Link is the forum and networking body for organisations interested in the environment of Northern Ireland.

Scotland:

Community Recycling Network Scotland represents 3rd sector involvement in waste recycling/minimisation/re-use.

Wales:

The community waste recycling sector is represented by the Wales Community Recycling Network, Cylch. The organisation receives core funding from WG.

England:

Information to follow

Northern Ireland:

Consultation due in July 2013

How:
Recycling Bill may follow the Welsh model
Economic Benefits?
The proposed move toward 'Resource Efficiency' will have similar aims to Scotland and Wales: saving money through waste prevention, trying to maximise the value of waste, and to deal with waste as locally as possible.

Consultation on Recyclate Quality, MRF Code of Practice etc are due soon!

Scotland:

The Scottish Government consulted on “Safeguarding Scotland`s Resources – a programme for the efficient use of resources” in October 2012

Feedack form the consultation has not been published, but one of the key aspects was development of a dedicated Business Resource Efficiency service  -  Resource Efficient Scotland was launched in April 2013: www.resourceefficientscotland.com/

How:

The Waste Scotland Regulations 2012. The Scottish Parliament have adopted a phased approach to rolling out the key measure in the regulations, including:

Businesses to present metal, glass, plastic, paper/card for separate collection form 1/1/14;

Food businesses producing over 50kg of food waste/week to present food for seperate collection  from 1/1/14 (those producing over 5kg/week from 1/1/16);

A ban on key separately collected recyclables being incinerated or landfilled from 1/1/14 (plastic, card/paper, glass, metal, food waste); 

A ban on BMW to landfill form 1/1/21;

Clear guidelines have been produced on application of the Regulations in different areas (rural, sparsely populated/urban, densely populated etc); 

Zero Waste Scotland, an amalgamation of key Waste/Environmental organisations has come together as one to support/advise/fund stakeholders: http://www.zerowastescotland.org.uk/

The Greener Scotland website has also been set up as a “one-stop shop” for information, advice and motivation to lead a more sustainable life: http://www.greenerscotland.org/

As has Resource Efficient Scotland (although the website is currently out of action)

Economic Benefits?
A key aim of hte Zero Waste Strategy Plan is to talk about resources rather than waste.  To reduce resource use via smart product aand packaging design, deal with the waste that is produced as sustainably as possible, and get as much economic value from waste as possible.

New technologies are currently being tested: nappy recycling trial with 4 Scottish Councils - http://www.knowaste.com/parents-carers-users

 

Wales:

Being consulted on at present; proposed targets:

Waste reduction by 1.2% per year to 2050 (based on 2006/7 levels)

 Aim is to achieve 27% reduction in waste by 2025, “zero waste” by 2050 i.e either prevented, reused or recycled/composted.

 Action focused at food, paper, card, clothing, consumer goods, plastic (packaging)

 A key objective of the proposed Waste Prevention Programme is to break the link between waste generation & economic growth; i.e. making the best use of resources by efficient processes & product design/ decoupling waste generation from economic growth.

e.g All products designed for disassembly & reuse or recycling; recycling processes will be closed loop or employ “upcycling”; as far as possible recyclate will be used in Welsh manufacturing processes

How:
Mandatory recycling and recovery targets and potential penalties of £200/tonne over target if not achieved:  http://www.legislation.gov.uk/wsi/2011/551/made

 

Proposed 4Es model of behaviour change for Waste Prevention. Campaigns: engaging, enabling, encouraging and execmplifying.

Economic Benefits:

A key aim of the zero Waste Plan is to design out waste, develop technologies to deal with the waste that is produced as sustainably as possible, and to manage waste within Wales where possible.   In doing so, waste will be reduced (saving money); jobs and markets will be created within Wales.

New Technologies are currently being tested: nappy recycling trail with 2 Welsh Councils - http://www.knowaste.com/parents-carers-users